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2010 MAPOC Legal Scholoarship Conference

Sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference (MAPOC), the University of Virginia Center for the Study of Race and Law and the Virginia Journal of Social Policy and the Law

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Registration | Accommodations | Directions | Parking at the Law School
Publication Opportunity | Works-In-Progress | Student Writing Competition
Distributing Books/Reprints | People With Disabilities | Contact Us

Schedule

THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010
6:00-7:30 p.m. Meet and Greet Reception
Registration
(Omni Hotel Atrium, Downtown Charlottesville)

At this informal reception, conference attendees can unwind from an afternoon of travel. Heavy hors d'oeuvres, wine, beer and soft drinks will be served. The hotel and adjacent Downtown Mall have a variety of dining options for those who are interested in dinner following the reception.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010
8:30 a.m. Bus to Law School in front of Omni Hotel
8:45-9:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast and Registration
(Withers-Brown Hall, Student Lounge, across from Room WB128)
9:30-9:45 a.m.

Opening Remarks (Withers-Brown Hall, Room WB128)

Paul G. Mahoney, Dean, University of Virginia School of Law
Cassandra Jones Havard, University of Baltimore School of Law
Kim Forde-Mazrui, University of Virginia School of Law

9:45-11:15 a.m. PANEL I (Withers-Brown Hall, Room WB128)

The Sit-Ins

This panel will focus on the student sit-ins that were initiated on February 1, 1960, in Greensboro, North Carolina, and spread across the south and nation. The panel will include law professors, historians and civil rights activists who were either personally involved in the sit-in movement or who have studied them. Questions may include what led to the sit-ins, what were their objectives and strategies, and what was their most direct impact.

Panelists:
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, University of Virginia School of Law
Theodore C. Delaney, Washington & Lee University, History Dept.
Brenda Saunders Hampden, Seton Hall University School of Law
J. Gordon Hylton, Marquette University Law School

Moderator:
Deborah E. McDowell, University of Virginia, Woodson Institute & English Dept.

11:15-11:30 a.m. Break
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. PANEL II (Withers-Brown Hall, Room WB128)

Social and Legal Developments in the Domestic Sphere

This panel will examine social and legal reform movements in the United States during the last third of the twentieth century. Topics may include movements by ethnic groups other than African-Americans, as well as the women’s rights, gay rights, labor and anti-war movements. Panelists may also address legislative and doctrinal developments influenced by the sit-ins including state and federal civil rights laws, and constitutional law developments concerning, for example, police discretion, state action, substantive due process, equal protection, and free expression.

Panelists:
Taunya Banks, University of Maryland School of Law
Risa Goluboff, University of Virginia School of Law
Darren Hutchinson, American University Washington College of Law
Juan F. Perea, University of Florida Levin College of Law

Moderator:
Mildred W. Robinson
, University of Virginia School of Law

1:15-2:30 p.m. Lunch and keynote (Caplin Pavilion, middle of Clay Hall)

Julian Bond, University of Virginia Professor of History and NAACP Chairperson
2:45-3:45 p.m. concurrent works iN progress

Session 1

During this session, three or four scholars will present a work-in-progress, each in a different classroom.  See the schedule in your packet or this PDF for the schedule of which papers will be presented in which room.

3:45-4 p.m. Break
4-5:30 p.m. PANEL III

(Withers-Brown Hall, Room WB128)

Social and Legal Developments in the International Sphere

This panel will examine the relationship between international and domestic legal change. Panelists may explore how social movements and actors abroad influenced American constitutional and legislative developments, and how domestic social movements informed developments in international law and the law of other nations.

Panelists:
Carol Anderson, Emory University, African American Studies Dept.
Stephanie Farrior, Vermont Law School
H. Timothy Lovelace, University of Virginia (Ph.D. candidate, History Dept.; J.D., M.A.)
Henry J. Richardson III, Temple University Beasley School of Law

Moderator:
Deena R. Hurwitz, University of Virginia School of Law

5:40 p.m. Meet bus at Massie Rd. bus stop, directly in front of the Law School. Bus will shuttle attendees to the Omni Hotel immediately following Panel III
7 p.m.

Dinner and Evening Entertainment

Dinner at Bashir’s Restaurant, 507 E Main St., 434-923-0927.  Attendees should meet in the Omni hotel lobby by 6:45 p.m. to walk to restaurant.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010
8:45 a.m. Bus to Law School in front of Omni Hotel
9-9:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast and Registration
9:30-11 a.m. Roundtable (Withers-Brown Hall, Room WB128)

Current and Future Social Movements

During the roundtable, participants will examine contemporary debates over pressing issues, such as LGBT rights, immigration, environmental justice, healthcare reform, racial profiling, and felon disenfranchisement. Other questions may include whether protest or other extrajudicial activism can or should play a role in contemporary movements and what role may technology play in aiding or impeding political activism.

Panelists:
Leonard M. Baynes, St. John’s University School of Law
Michele B. Goodwin, University of Minnesota Law School
Claudrena Harold, University of Virginia, History Dept.
Muriel Morisey, Temple University Beasley School of Law

Moderator:
Yared Getachew, University of Virginia School of Law

11-11:15 a.m. Break
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. concurrent works iN progress

Session 2

During this session, three or four scholars will present a work-in-progress, each in a different classroom.  See the schedule in your packet or this PDFfor the schedule of which papers will be presented in which room.


12:30 p.m.-1:45 p.m. Lunch and keynote (Caplin Pavilion, middle of Clay Hall)

Rev. Charles Sherrod
Albany State University Professor of Political Science and former SNCC Field Secretary
2-3 p.m. concurrent works-in-progress

Session 3

During this session, three or four scholars will present a work-in-progress, each in a different classroom.  See the schedule in your packet or this PDFfor the schedule of which papers will be presented in which room.

3-3:15 p.m. Break
3:15-4:15 p.m. concurrent works iN progress

Session 4

During this session, three or four scholars will present a work-in-progress, each in a different classroom.  See the schedule in your packet or this PDFfor the schedule of which papers will be presented in which room.

4:15-4:30 p.m. Break
4:30-5:15 p.m.

planning session (Withers-Brown Hall, Room WB128)

Planning for 2011/2012 conference

Note that the Third National People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference will take place at Seton Hall University School of Law on September 9-12, 2010. As a result, some people may prefer that we avoid holding a MAPOC conference in January, 2011, waiting instead until 2012. The desired site for the next MAPOC is Howard University School of Law. This planning session will discuss, among other things, which year the next MAPOC conference should take place.

5:15-5:30 p.m. Break
5:30-5:45 p.m. the last word (Withers-Brown Hall, Room WB128)

Phoebe Haddon, Dean, University of Maryland School of Law

5:45-6 p.m. closing remarks (Withers-Brown Hall, Room WB128)

Henry L. Chambers Jr., University of Richmond School of Law



PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY

Articles by conference panelists will be published in the Virginia Journal of Social Policy and the Law (first draft by 1/24/10, final by 3/1/10).  Works in progress will be considered for publication. The manuscripts should be 25-40 double-spaced pages in length.  Citations should be in bluebook format.  Submission drafts should be e-mailed to Alexandra Morgan at amorgan@virginia.edu by March 1.


WORKS-IN-PROGRESS

Work-in-progress papers presented during the concurrent works-in-progress sessions will be considered for publication by the Virginia Journal of Social Policy and the Law. To present a work-in-progress, e-mail a request to Hank Chambers at hchamber@richmond.edu. See submission guidelines and contact person under publication opportunity above.


ACCOMMODATIONS

A block of rooms has been reserved at the Omni Charlottesville Hotel, 235 West Main St., Charlottesville, Va., 22902.  To receive the special rate of $119/night, please call 434-971-5500 and mention the University of Virginia School of Law.  The deadline for this special rate is January 7, 2010. The nearby Downtown Mall has many dining options.


DIRECTIONS

To the Law School

From the Northeast: From the Beltway around Washington, D.C., take I-66 West to the second Rt. 29 exit (at Gainesville). Go south on Rt. 29 until you reach Charlottesville. Go under the 250 Bypass, pass the Barracks Road Shopping Center on your right and turn right at the traffic light at Arlington Blvd. The Law School is at the end of Arlington Blvd. For visitor parking, turn left on Massie Rd., take the first right (onto Nash Rd.), and turn into the parking lot on the right.
 
From the South: Take I-64 West from I-95 in Richmond, or come up by Rt. 29 North from Greensboro, N.C. Either way, take Rt. 29 North to the Leonard Sandridge Rd. exit. Turn left at the traffic light (onto Massie Rd.). You will pass Darden, the business school, on the left; take the next left onto Nash Rd. and make an immediate right into the Law School's visitor parking lot.

From the West: Take I-64 East, or take the Pennsylvania Turnpike, I-81 South and I-64 East. To get to the Law School, take Rt. 29 North. See directions under "From the South" above.


To the Omni Charlottesville Hotel

From the Northeast: Take Rt. 29 South into Charlottesville to Rt. 250 Bypass East. Take 250 Bypass East to the third traffic light, turn right onto McIntire Road. Go 7/10 mile to the second stop light. Go through the traffic light and the hotel is on the left.

From the South: Take Route 29 North to Route 250 Bypass East (29 North will turn into 250 Bypass East). Take 250 Bypass East to third traffic light, turn right onto McIntire Rd. Go 7/10 mile to the second stop light. Go through the traffic light and the hotel is on the left. 

From the West: Take I-64 East, or take the Pennsylvania Turnpike, I-81 South and I-64 East.  Take Exit 120 from I-64 and follow 5th St. North 2 miles to Historic Downtown.  The hotel is located on the right.


From the Omni Charlottesville Hotel to the Law School

Turn right out of the Omni parking garage onto Ridge St.  At the first traffic light, make a left onto Preston Ave.  Preston Ave. becomes Rugby Rd. after one mile.  Continue for 1/10 mile on Rugby Rd. and at the traffic light, make a very slight left onto Barracks Rd.  Follow Barracks Rd., and at the next traffic light, turn left onto Rt. 29 S/Emmett St. Pass the Barracks Road Shopping Center on your right and turn right at the traffic light at Arlington Blvd.  The Law School is at the end of Arlington Blvd.


PARKING AT THE LAW SCHOOL

Parking at the Law School is very limited on weekdays and attendees are encouraged to ride the shuttle bus from the Omni Hotel.  For those who must drive to the Law School on Friday, January 29, parking will be available in visitor spaceswhich will be marked with signs in the D-2 parking lot off Nash Drive.  If these spaces are full, there are additional spaces in the D-2 lot behind the Law School building.  Attendees parking in these locations on Friday must pick up a permit from the receptionist located inside the main entrance to the building.   On Saturday, January 30, parking is unrestricted (no permit required) and attendees may park in any available parking space around the Law School buildings. Download this PDF map for more details.



STUDENT WRITING COMPETITION - Deadline extended to January 5, 2010

Students are invited to submit a paper to MAPOC's forthcoming conference, 50 Years After the Sit-Ins: Reflecting on the Role of Protest in Social Movements and Law Reform, which will be held at the University of Virginia School of Law, January 28-30, 2010. Papers should focus on the theme of the conference or engage with more general questions pertaining to social movements and legal reform.

Two student papers will be recognized. MAPOC will select one student paper for its Outstanding Student Writing Award. In addition, the University of Virginia Black Law Students Association will recognize one student paper for outstanding scholarship exploring the relationship between social movements, legal reform and the African Diaspora. Both awards will be announced at the Conference. Each winner will receive $500 and may have an opportunity to be published in the Virginia Journal of Social Policy and the Law.

Students who wish to submit an entry must be considered a student in good standing during the 2009-2010 academic year at any ABA accredited law degree program in the United States. The Selection Committee will consider all papers meeting the eligibility criteria that are submitted by the deadline.

Papers must be submitted electronically to Tim Lovelace, Assistant Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Law, University of Virginia School of Law, at timlovelace@virginia.edu. Students must format their papers in Microsoft Word. The main text should be in 12-point font and double-spaced with 1-inch margins on all sides of each page. The paper should have footnotes, not endnotes, and the footnotes should be no smaller than 9-point font. Papers should be no more than 15,000 words, and papers no longer than 40 pages are preferred. Only one paper per entrant will be considered. The deadline for the Competition has been extended. All entries must be submitted by January 5, 2010.

All students, whether or not paper competition participants, are invited to register to attend the Conference. For registration please visit the registration page.

The principal sponsors of the Conference are the Mid-Atlantic People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference (MAPOC), the University of Virginia Center for the Study of Race and Law, and the Virginia Journal of Social Policy and the Law. Additional sponsors include the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies and the University of Virginia Black Law Students Association.


DISTRIBUTING BOOKS/REPRINTS

Do you want to distribute your articles/books?  There will be a table at the conference for this purpose. If you wrote a book loosely related to the themes of the conference that you would like made available for purchase, please call or e-mail Larry Rambo at the law school bookstore by Jan. 19 (20th at the latest), at ler9d@virginia.edu or 434-924-3333 (bookstore).

PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

Please let us know if you have any disability or other condition for which we can provide accommodation.  Friday night's dinner will be a six block walk through Charlottesville's pedestrian downtown mall - if you will need assistance with that or anything else please see "Contact Us" below.


CONTACT US

If you have any questions, please contact us by e-mail at lawevents@virginia.edu, or by phone at 434-924-4684. Also, I can be reached at kimfm@virginia.edu, 434-924-3299 (office), 434-825-1970 (cell, leave detailed message). Tim Lovelace, Esq., the Center's Assistant Director, can be reached at timlovelace@virginia.edu, 434-409-6333.


Schedule | Registration | Accommodations | Directions | Parking at the Law School
Publication Opportunity | Works-In-Progress | Student Writing Competition
Distributing Books/Reprints | People With Disabilities | Contact Us

Photo: Research Division of the Oklahoma Historical Society