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Posted Jan. 27, 2006

Author David Baldacci to Address Class of 2006

AbramsNovelist David Baldacci, a 1986 graduate of the School of Law, will address the Class of 2006 at Final Exercises on the School’s Holcombe Green Lawn May 21. Baldacci’s 12 novels include a string of 10 consecutive titles on the New York Times bestseller list, beginning with Absolute Power in 1997, which was also made into a motion picture starring Clint Eastwood and Gene Hackman. His other works, many of which have won awards for suspense fiction, include Total Control, The Winner, The Simple Truth, Saving Faith, Wish You Well, Last Man Standing, The Christmas Train, Split Second, Hour Game, his debut novel in his young adult series Freddy and the French Fries: Fries Alive!, and, most recently, The Camel Club. He has also published a novella for the Dutch titled Office Hours, written for Holland's Year 2000 "Month of the Thriller," as well as seven original screenplays. His books have been translated into 37 languages and sold in more than 80 countries. Over 40 million copies of Mr. Baldacci's books are in print worldwide.

"He was also chosen in 2002 to be the featured speaker at valedictory exercises by University of Virginia undergraduates, and did an excellent job," said Jasmine Yoon, Student Bar Association Graduation Committee Chair for the Class of 2006. "The committee is honored to have him speak for us and share his unique career history."

Born in Virginia, where he continues to live, Baldacci earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from Virginia Commonwealth University and after graduating from the School of Law practiced for nine years in Washington, D.C., as both a trial and corporate attorney.

He serves as a national ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and participates in numerous charities, including the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy, the American Cancer Society, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. He sits on the boards of the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Virginia Commonwealth University.
• Reported by M. Marshall

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