Spring 2014
    Law No.: LAW8025
    Sched. No.: 114220200

Advanced Contracts
Section 1
X
Johnston, Jason S.



Administrative Information:
During SIS enrollment, check on SIS for real-time enrollment numbers
Days, Times (Room):TR, 1000-1120 (WB105)
Credits:3Type:Lecture
Capacity:44 **This information is current as of 04/23/2014 06:15:10 AM**
Current Enrollment:14 **This information is current as of 04/23/2014 06:15:10 AM**
Syllabus: View Syllabus (requires LawWeb account)



Course Description:

This course introduces students to a variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of both consumer and business contracts. The disciplines include economics, psychology and finance. Some attention will be paid to the analysis of common law contract doctrines, but a good deal of the course will focus on public policy issues surrounding the regulation of consumer, commercial and financial contracts. Students will be exposed to both normative analysis of contract law and regulation and to positive analysis of how people actually contract in the shadow of the common law and regulation. A considerable amount of time will be spent on contract design: not only on understanding how the common law and regulation shape incentives for contract design, but also in applying insights from economics, game theory and psychology to design “better” contracts: contracts that generate actual assent and which further the objectives of the parties. At least one third of the course will focus on the regulation of consumer financial contracts by agencies such as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. This part of the course will closely examine behavioral economic versus neoclassical explanations and justifications for various regulatory interventions. At least one quarter of the course will consist of a basic introduction to the economic (primarily game theoretic) approach to the analysis of contracting. As much as one quarter of the course may focus on how contracts shape the incentives of corporate managers and directors. Although this course will explore issues raised by particular cases and doctrines and statutes and regulations, it is not a doctrinal course. Instead, students will be expected to study carefully articles in law reviews, and selected portions of articles in peer-edited journals in economics, finance and psychology.

The course grade will be based 15% on class participation and 85% on performance on the final examination.

NOTE: Laptops are not allowed during class sessions.

PREREQUISITE: Contracts. Consumer Law and/or Selected Topics in Consumer Bankruptcy (SC), Corporate Finance recommended, but not required
COURSE REQUIREMENT: Examination and class participation



Prerequisites:Contracts. Consumer Law and/or Selected Topics in Consumer Bankruptcy (SC), Corporate Finance recommended, but not required