Fall 2013
    Law No.: LAW7106
    Sched. No.: 113820947

Law of the Police
Section 1
X
Harmon, Rachel A.



Administrative Information:
During SIS enrollment, check on SIS for real-time enrollment numbers
Days, Times (Room):MW, 1410-1530 (SL298)
Credits:3Type:Lecture
Capacity:64 **This information is current as of 04/22/2014 06:15:52 AM**
Current Enrollment:24 **This information is current as of 04/22/2014 06:15:52 AM**
Syllabus: View Syllabus (requires LawWeb account)



Course Description:

This course explores the web of federal, state, and local laws that governs the police. Though the readings in this course include cases, statutes, and secondary materials, and you will learn some substantive law, the emphasis of this class is on a set of policy questions: How--and how well--do we use law to regulate policing? How does law affect police work? The answers to these questions tell us something important about the nature of regulation and law as well as about policing as an institution. To address these questions, we start by looking anew at several familiar constitutional criminal procedure cases to illuminate the Supreme Court’s tools for limiting police conduct. We contrast these with instances of non-constitutional efforts to dictate police behavior, such as the entrapment doctrine, Congressional privacy statutes, and state statutes regulating police interactions with immigrants. In the second part of the course, we analyze law incentivizing police behavior, focusing first on the limits of traditional legal remedies, such as the exclusionary rule, 1983 suits for damages, federal suits for injunctive relief, and criminal prosecution, as means for influencing police conduct. As an alternative, we will consider whether other laws that influence police conduct, such as asset forfeiture law and federal conditional spending programs, may be used towards similar ends. Finally, in the last part of the course, we will examine how law shapes the production and access to information about police behavior, from the data available about policing to whether or not citizens can videotape the police. The format of this course is primarily lecture with some class discussion.

NOTE: Laptops are not allowed during class sessions.

PREREQUISITE or CONCURRENT: Civil Rights Litigation and Criminal Investigation or Criminal Procedure Survey recommended, but not required
MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE with: Police Misconduct
COURSE REQUIREMENT: Examination

Prerequisites:Civil Rights Litigation and Criminal Investigation or Criminal Procedure Survey recommended, but not required
Mutually Exclusive with: Police Misconduct