LawTech Center

LawTech Center

LawTech Center

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Legal Fellows support the work of the LawTech Center by conducting research, publishing papers and spearheading events.

2021-22 Fellows

Ashley Anumba ’24 is a member of the Black Law Students Association and the Health Law Association. Her current academic and legal interests include Medicaid and health care regulatory issues, as well as privacy concerns among welfare recipients. As an undergraduate, Anumba was introduced to the intersection of health and privacy and has furthered this interest while in law school. Outside of her studies, Anumba is training for the 2024 Olympics and mentors high school athletes in utilizing athletics to pursue their dreams. 

Shivani Arimilli ’23 is interested in the ways that technological developments affect social inequality and wealth stratification under current legal and economic regimes. Arimilli previously worked for the Conservation Law Foundation, an environmental advocacy nonprofit. During the summer of 2022, she plans to work for Quinn Emanuel in San Francisco, and aims to specialize in intellectual property litigation. At UVA Law, Arimilli is a Community Fellow, a Law & Public Service Fellow, the vice president of the Student Bar Association, a member of both the Virginia Law Review and Virginia Environmental Law Journal, and a future Peer Advisor.

Bao Kham Chau ’22 is a co-founder and director of the Cornell Xenophobia Meter Project, a design and technology managing editor for the Virginia Journal of International Law, and a technology consultant for the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology. He received his B.A. in computer science, history, and political science at the University of California, Berkeley, and his M.A. in regional studies, East Asia at Harvard University. Before attending Virginia Law, he worked as a senior software engineer at Lyft, Cisco and a smart grid company, which has since gone through an initial public offering, that helped build the infrastructure for the Internet of Things. Additionally, Bao interned at NASA Dryden, where he participated in an experimental effort to bring back commercial supersonic flights. His research interests focus on the complex interplay between the digital and the analog. Specifically, Bao is interested in examining how to mitigate the harmful effects of algorithmic biases on marginalized communities.

André Earls ’24 serves on the editorial board of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and is also a member of the Black Law Students Association. A graduate of Wiley College (B.A.) and Northwestern University (M.S.J.), he majored in journalism, media and political communications throughout his tenure. During his time covering Capitol Hill, he contributed on articles concerning the Senate Banking Committee and Facebook’s proposed cryptocurrency, Libra. He is very interested in writing about data privacy and the emergence and regulation of blockchain technology.  

Laura Faas ’23 serves as an articles editor for the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and spent this past summer as a research assistant to Professor Danielle Citron, helping Citron revise the manuscript of her forthcoming book. Faas' particular interests in technology pertain to digital health, tech ethics, privacy and content moderation practices. She will spend the summer of 2022 in her hometown of Boston working for the law firm Morgan, Lewis & Bockius.

Sarah Guinee ’23 principally focuses on public discourse as a pillar of democracy. She has written and commented on digital threats against journalists, and her work spans government secrecy, platform governance and the right to protest. At UVA Law, she is involved with the National Security Law Forum; Law, Innovation, Security & Technology; and the University Judiciary Committee. She is articles editor of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and has served as a research assistant and grader at the Law School and on Main Grounds. In 2021, she worked at the Brennan Center for Justice as a Democracy Summer Fellow.

Emily Hockett ’22 is a Program in Law and Public Service fellow, a submissions review editor for the Virginia Journal of International Law and a research assistant for Professor Danielle Citron. Hockett has also been vice president of Lambda Law Alliance, community outreach chair of the National Lawyers Guild chapter, a Legal Writing Fellow and a participant in the Civil Rights and First Amendment clinics. She is a 2021-22 Ritter Scholar.

Gabriele Josephs ’24 is from Freeport, Bahamas. He graduated from the University of Richmond with a B.A. in political science, concentrating in political philosophy. Josephs is interested in researching how the reemergence of the far-right intersects with the recrudescence of race science and how online platforms can and do affect these twin trends. Outside of the LawTech Fellowship, Josephs is a member of the Black Law Students Association.

Peter Kaplan ’22 serves as the managing editor for Volume 107 of the Virginia Law Review. He served as a 2021 summer associate at Kaplan Hecker & Fink, where he plans to work after graduation. During the summer of 2020, Kaplan served as a legal associate at Salesforce. He is also a Virginia Law and Public Service Fellow, a member and former career co-chair of Lambda Law Alliance; a member of the student organization Law, Innovation, Security & Technology, and a member of the Jewish Law Students Association. Prior to law school, Kaplan was strategy director at Helena and program manager at the Aspen Institute. He began his career in Washington, D.C., as a Brent Scowcroft Award Fellow with the Aspen Strategy Group.

Kathryn Kenny ’24 serves as a First Year Council representative and is a member of the Virginia Law & Business Society, the Jewish Law Students Association, Virginia Law Emerging Companies and Venture Capital, and the Virginia Law Prison Project. Prior to law school, she worked as a researcher and assisted with a project focusing on the relationship between emerging technologies, the right to free speech and polarization within the U.S., and a project analyzing the impact of COVID-19 on domestic surveillance. She also worked on the campaign to end the death penalty in Colorado, which first sparked her interest in the law as a key tool to protect civil liberties. Now she is interested in data privacy and the relationship between the growth of technology and rights protection, in addition to areas of the law related to business.

Max Larson ’23 serves as the president of the American Constitution Society at UVA Law, an editor for the Virginia Journal of International Law, and a research assistant for Professors Danielle Citron and Naomi Cahn. She is also a member of Lambda Law Alliance; the student organization Law, Innovation, Security & Technology; and a member at large of the National Lawyers Guild Chapter. She is interested in data privacy litigation and privacy civil liberties. 

Sally Levin ’24 is a 1L representative for the Jewish Law Students Association and is on the Programming Committee of the Student Bar Association. She is also a member of Virginia Law Women. Prior to law school, she worked as a legal assistant at a law firm in Durham, North Carolina. As an undergraduate, Levin assisted with research related to student expression and First Amendment rights on college campuses. She is interested in technology, privacy and copyright. 

Matthew Lyskawa ’23 is currently working on a Ph.D. in philosophy from Harvard University. His dissertation argues that the justificatory basis of the basic right to freedom of speech lies in the unique role that speech plays in producing the social world. Lyskawa will spend the summer of 2022 as a summer associate at Goodwin Procter in Boston. His areas of interest include data privacy, cybersecurity and national security. 

Andrew Nell ’23 is president of the student organization Law, Innovation, Security & Technology and serves on the Virginia Law Review. Nell has several years of experience working on intellectual property matters and with tech-related transactions. He has also served for the past six years in the Marine Corps reserve. Nell will be spending his 2022 summer at WilmerHale in his adopted home city of Washington, D.C. His areas of interest include national security, cybersecurity and data privacy.

Madelaine Pisani ’24 is a member of the Innocence Project and the UVA Law Mock Trial Team. Prior to law school, she worked as a political journalist in Washington, D.C., covering gubernatorial politics and Senate politics for National Journal. Pisani has contributed chapters of two books published by the University of Virginia Center for Politics. She is interested in data privacy, cybersecurity and antitrust issues. 

Tolu Ojuola ’24 is a 1L representative for the Advocates for Disability Rights Club and a member of the Black Law Students Association. Prior to law school she worked as a legal intern for a nonprofit organization in D.C. exploring the intersection of law and technology with minority communities. Since starting law school she’s become especially fascinated with privacy law and how it affects what she’s passionate about. Her areas of interest include privacy, civil rights and compliance. In 2022 she will work as a research assistant for Professor Danielle Citron. 

Sean Onwualu ’24, born and raised in Los Angeles, has legal and academic interests that include privacy regulations, U.S. policy around privacy, sports law issues and antitrust issues. Onwualu is currently spending his first-year summer interning for Apple on their Legal & Global Security Team. At UVA, Onwualu serves as secretary for the Black Law Students Association, vice president of On Campus Programming for the Virginia Sports and Entertainment Society, and a junior editor for the Virginia Sports & Entertainment Law Journal. He is a Community Fellow for the 2024 class and a future Peer Advisor. 

Alex Schechner ’23 is a Virginia Law and Public Service Fellow; an editor for the Virginia Journal of Social Policy & the Law; a research assistant for Professor Megan Stevenson, and a member of the Innocence Project, Virginia Law First-Generation Professionals and the Jewish Law Students Association. During the summer of 2021, Schechner served as a clerk for the Florida Justice Institute. He will serve as a 2022 summer clerk for the Disability Rights Section of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division. Before law school, Schechner worked for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee defending “frontline” members of Congress and assisting top-tier “red-to-blue” challenger candidates during the 2018 and 2020 election cycles. He began his career in Washington, D.C., as a legislative intern for multiple members of Congress and with the American Federation of Teachers. Schechner is interested in the regulation of data commercialization and internet architecture, and digital privacy and speech civil liberties. 

Taylor Stenberg ’24 serves on the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and is vice president of professional development and pro bono for Law, Innovation, Security & Technology at Virginia Law. She attended the University of St Andrews in Scotland, where she received a Master of Arts (Honours) in international relations. Before attending Virginia Law, she worked with early and mid-stage startup companies in Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe’s Technology Companies Group and in Y Combinator’s legal team. Her areas of interest include data privacy, cybersecurity and emerging companies. 

Divya Vijay ’24 is a representative for the Public Interest Law Association and a member of the Innocence Project. She is also a member of the National Lawyers Guild Chapter; the student organization Law, Innovation, Security & Technology; and the South Asian Law Students Association. Prior to law school, she worked as a research assistant for the Center for American Progress and interned for Senator Kamala Harris in Washington, D.C. She is interested in national security, technology and civil rights.

Rebecca Weitzel ’22 is editor-in-chief of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and has held leadership roles in two other student organizations, serving as president of Law, Innovation, Security & Technology and vice president of Child Advocacy Research and Education. She is also a Peer Advisor and Community Fellow. She is interested in data privacy legislation. 

 

 

Gabriele Josephs