LawTech Center

LawTech Center

LawTech Center

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Legal Fellows support the work of the LawTech Center by conducting research, publishing papers and spearheading events.

2022-23 Fellows

Ashley Anumba ’24 is a member of the Black Law Students Association and the Health Law Association. Her current academic and legal interests include Medicaid and health care regulatory issues, as well as privacy concerns among welfare recipients. As an undergraduate, Anumba was introduced to the intersection of health and privacy and has furthered this interest while in law school. Outside of her studies, Anumba is training for the 2024 Olympics and mentors high school athletes in utilizing athletics to pursue their dreams. 

Shivani Arimilli ’23 is interested in the ways that technological developments affect social inequality and wealth stratification under current legal and economic regimes. Arimilli previously worked for the Conservation Law Foundation, an environmental advocacy nonprofit. During the summer of 2022, she worked for Quinn Emanuel in San Francisco, specializing in intellectual property litigation. At UVA Law, Arimilli is a Community Fellow, a Law & Public Service Fellow, the vice president of the Student Bar Association, a member of both the Virginia Law Review and Virginia Environmental Law Journal, and a future Peer Advisor.

Casey Crowley ’24 is an assistant executive editor for the Journal of Law & Politics and a member of Rivanna Investments and The Federalist Society. Prior to law school, he worked as an intern for the Colorado Attorney General’s Office and helped draft legislation protecting biometric privacy. He is interested in election law, privacy and First Amendment issues. 

Emma Danziger ’24 serves on the editorial board of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and is the president of the Jewish Law Students Association at UVA Law. She is also a member of the Virginia Law Emerging Companies and Venture Capital Society, the Virginia Law & Business Society, and Virginia Law Women. She will spend the summer of 2023 as a summer associate in the corporate group at Willkie, Farr & Gallagher in New York. She is passionate about social media platform security policies and terms of service. 

Nadia Doherty ’24 is the current president of the student organization Law, Innovation, Security & Technology; vice president of operations for the National Security Law Forum; and a Peer Advisor. She serves on the editorial board of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and as a research assistant to Professor Kimberly Robinson. Prior to law school, she studied abroad in Amsterdam, where she researched the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and privacy in the EU. Her areas of interest include data privacy, cybersecurity and national security.

Courtney Douglas ’25 is a member of the American Constitution Society, Virginia Law Women and the Law Christian Fellowship. She is involved in pro bono work through the First Amendment Clinic and is also a Community Fellow. Prior to law school, she worked for the Center for International Security and Cooperation. She has also interned for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, the First Amendment Project and Davis Wright Tremaine. Her interests include government transparency, threats to journalists, and law and the humanities. 

André Earls ’24 serves on the editorial board of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and is also a member of the Black Law Students Association. A graduate of Wiley College (B.A.) and Northwestern University (M.S.J.), he majored in journalism, media and political communications. During his time covering Capitol Hill, he contributed on articles concerning the Senate Banking Committee and Facebook’s proposed cryptocurrency, Libra. He is very interested in writing about data privacy and the emergence and regulation of blockchain technology.  

Laura Faas ’23 enjoys a range of interests that primarily center on tech ethics, biotechnology and health law. She has served as a research assistant to Professor Danielle Citron, working on Citron’s “The Fight for Privacy.” Faas currently works as a research assistant for Professor Craig Konnoth and participates in the Health & Disability Law Clinic. After graduation, she will return to her hometown of Boston to join Morgan, Lewis & Bockius’s corporate and business transactions practice, where she hopes to focus on biotechnology and life science transactions. A member of the editorial board for the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology, she previously served as one of its articles editors. During her second year of law school, she held positions on the executive boards for the Law, Innovation, Security, & Technology Society; the Health Law Association, and the American Constitution Society. Faas is also a Community Fellow. Prior to UVA Law, Faas spent four years working as a health services researcher in Washington, D.C. 

Sarah Guinee ’23 principally focuses on public discourse as a pillar of democracy. She has written and commented on digital threats against journalists, and her work spans government secrecy, platform governance and the right to protest. At UVA Law, she is involved with the National Security Law Forum; Law, Innovation, Security & Technology; and the University Judiciary Committee. She is articles editor of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and has served as a research assistant and grader at the Law School and on Main Grounds. In 2021, she worked at the Brennan Center for Justice as a Democracy Summer Fellow.

Gabriele Josephs ’24 is from Freeport, Bahamas. He graduated from the University of Richmond with a B.A. in political science, concentrating in political philosophy. Josephs is interested in researching how the reemergence of the far-right intersects with the recrudescence of race science and how online platforms can and do affect these twin trends. Outside of the LawTech Fellowship, Josephs is the treasurer of the Black Law Students Association and an assistant articles editor for the Journal of Law & Politics.

Kathryn Kenny ’24 serves as a First Year Council representative and is a member of the Virginia Law & Business Society, the Jewish Law Students Association, Virginia Law Emerging Companies and Venture Capital, and the Virginia Law Prison Project. Prior to law school, she worked as a researcher and assisted with a project focusing on the relationship between emerging technologies, the right to free speech and polarization within the U.S., and a project analyzing the impact of COVID-19 on domestic surveillance. She also worked on the campaign to end the death penalty in Colorado, which first sparked her interest in the law as a key tool to protect civil liberties. Now she is interested in data privacy and the relationship between the growth of technology and rights protection, in addition to areas of the law related to business.

Jampa Lhasawa '25 is a member of the South Asian Law Student Association and Lambda Law Alliance, and is a 1L representative for the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy. Before law school, he worked as the Chapters Associate at the American Constitution Society. He's interested in consumer protection, technology regulation and platform accountability. 

Max Larson ’23 is interested in the ethical alignment of artificial intelligence and ways of regulating technology so that consumers' can benefit from technological advances without sacrificing their privacy and disproportionately infringing on the rights of marginalized groups. Max is a 2022-23 Ritter Scholar and member of the 2022 American Constitution Society Next Generation Leader program. She works as a research assistant for Professors Danielle Citron and Naomi Cahn and has participated in the Environmental Law and Community Engagement Clinic. At UVA Law, Max is a member of the American Constitution Society chapter, Lambda Law Alliance and the Virginia Collegiate Queer Collective, where she is actively engaged in advocacy for transgender rights. She previously served as the ACS chapter president, and a member of the National Lawyers Guild board, and worked with a small group of peers to plan the Title IX Anniversary Symposium. In 2022, Max worked for Covington & Burling in the Washington, D.C., office primarily in the privacy practice group. After graduating, she plans to clerk for Judge Mae A. D’Agostino.

Sally Levin ’24 is the vice president of membership for the Jewish Law Students Association and a UVA Law Ambassador. She also serves on the Virginia Journal of International Law and as a Legal Research and Writing Fellow. As an undergraduate, Levin assisted with research related to student expression and First Amendment rights on college campuses. She is interested in technology, privacy and copyright. In 2022, Levin spent the summer working in the Civil Division of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia. 

Matthew Lyskawa ’23 is currently working on a Ph.D. in philosophy from Harvard University. His dissertation argues that the justificatory basis of the basic right to freedom of speech lies in the unique role that speech plays in producing the social world. Lyskawa spent the summer of 2022 as a summer associate at Goodwin Procter in Boston. His areas of interest include data privacy, cybersecurity and national security.

Tessa Morrison ’25 joined UVA Law after several years of work experience in the economic research and financial services sectors. She is a member of the student organizations Law, Innovation, Security, & Technology and Virginia Law Women. Her professional experience exposed her to the many ways companies extract, collect, and exploit personal and behavioral data. Morrison’s areas of interest include data privacy, financial technology and algorithmic regulation. 

Andrew Nell ’23 is interested in cybersecurity, national security, and data privacy. Nell is an online editor for the Virginia Law Review, a student contributor for Lawfare, and a reservist in the U.S. Marine Corps. He previously served as president for the Law, Innovation, Security, & Technology Society and as a research assistant for Professor Danielle Citron. After graduation, Nell will be returning to Washington, D.C., and joining WilmerHale.  

Madelaine Pisani ’24 is a Peer Advisor and a member of the UVA Law Trial Advocacy Team and the Virginia Sports & Entertainment Law Journal. In 2022, she interned at the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Prior to law school, she worked as a political journalist in Washington, D.C., covering gubernatorial politics and Senate politics for National Journal. Pisani has written chapters for two books published by the University of Virginia Center for Politics on election trends. She is interested in data privacy, cybersecurity and evidentiary issues arising from police investigations. 

Tolu Ojuola ’24 is interested in the intersection of disability, civil rights and privacy law. Prior to law school, she worked as a legal intern for the National Association of the Deaf, utilizing her minor in American Sign Language to explore various issues including accessibility, health law and privacy. During her 1L summer, she worked on the Global Privacy Data Security team at The Walt Disney Company. She currently serves as an articles editor for the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology, secretary for the Advocates for Disability Rights, membership chair for the Black Law Students Association, and research assistant to Professor Danielle Citron. In 2023, she will work in the cybersecurity and privacy practice group at Willkie Farr & Gallagher in Washington, D.C. 

Sean Onwualu ’24, born and raised in Los Angeles, has legal and academic interests that include privacy regulations, U.S. policy around privacy, sports law issues and antitrust issues. Onwualu is currently spending his first-year summer interning for Apple on their Legal & Global Security Team. At UVA, Onwualu serves as secretary for the Black Law Students Association, vice president of On Campus Programming for the Virginia Sports and Entertainment Society, and a junior editor for the Virginia Sports & Entertainment Law Journal. He is a Community Fellow for the 2024 class and a future Peer Advisor. 

Alex Schechner ’23 is a Virginia Law and Public Service Fellow; an editor for the Virginia Journal of Social Policy & the Law; a research assistant for Professor Megan Stevenson, and a member of the Innocence Project, Virginia Law First-Generation Professionals and the Jewish Law Students Association. During the summer of 2021, Schechner served as a clerk for the Florida Justice Institute. He was a 2022 summer clerk for the Disability Rights Section of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division. Before law school, Schechner worked for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee defending “frontline” members of Congress and assisting top-tier “red-to-blue” challenger candidates during the 2018 and 2020 election cycles. He began his career in Washington, D.C., as a legislative intern for multiple members of Congress and with the American Federation of Teachers. Schechner is interested in the regulation of data commercialization and internet architecture, and digital privacy and speech civil liberties. 

Shelby Singleton ’25 is a member of the Black Law Students Association and the Virginia Innocence Project’s Public Policy team, and is a Community Fellow. Prior to attending UVA Law, Singleton graduated from George Washington University with a Bachelor of Arts in political communication. She participated in several internships on Capitol Hill and is interested in creating equitable public policy at the intersection of technology and racial justice. 

Jeff Stautberg ’25 is a member of Law, Innovation, Security & Technology; the National Security Law Forum; and the American Constitution Society. He is also a Community Fellow for the 2025 class. Prior to UVA Law, Stautberg spent three years working in forensic and litigation consulting, where he primarily focused on investigations and litigation matters related to data privacy and securities fraud. His interests include data privacy, technology regulation and national security. 

Taylor Stenberg ’24 serves on the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and is vice president of professional development and pro bono for Law, Innovation, Security & Technology at Virginia Law. She attended the University of St Andrews in Scotland, where she received a Master of Arts (Honours) in international relations. Before attending Virginia Law, she worked with early and mid-stage startup companies in Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe’s Technology Companies Group and in Y Combinator’s legal team. Her areas of interest include data privacy, cybersecurity and emerging companies. 

Riddhi Suva ’25 is a member of the Law, Innovation, Security & Technology Society and Virginia Law Women, and serves as a 1L representative for the National Security Law Forum. She is interested in the intersection of data privacy, cybersecurity and national security. Prior to law school, she worked for the CNA Corporation, where she authored reports on emerging data privacy and mis-, dis- and mal-information risks for the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. She also developed scenarios for infrastructure resilience exercises for the National Academies of Sciences. Before joining CNA, Suva conducted risk and compliance research at Gartner for Fortune 500 C-suite executives. Suva graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 2019.  

Divya Vijay ’24 is an editor on the Virginia Journal of International Law and the vice president of Virginia Law Women. She is a research assistant for Professor Kristen Eichensehr and is a member of the Human Rights Study Project at UVA Law. In 2022, she worked for the Electronic Privacy Information Center as a Democracy Summer Fellow. She is interested in national security, technology and human rights. Vijay graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2019.

Dah-Wei (David) Yih ’23 serves on the editorial board of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and is a member of the Law, Innovation, Security & Technology Society; the National Security Law Forum; and the American Constitution Society at Virginia Law. His areas of academic interest include data privacy, cybersecurity and national security law. Prior to studies in the U.S., He received his Bachelor of Laws and Master of Laws degree with honors from National Chengchi University (NCCU), Taiwan, where he was granted merit-based government scholarship and served as an articles editor for the Constitutional Review and a legal adviser in a pro bono legal aid clinic. His master’s thesis at NCCU, which was awarded the Dissertation Prize of 2022 by the Congress of Taiwan, examined how partisan self-regulation has diversified parliamentary politics from the perspective of law of democracy. In 2019, he was awarded the Taiwan Government scholarship for advanced legal studies overseas. Before coming to the U.S., he also spent more than one year serving as a legal research assistant at National Taiwan University, where he analyzed national security issues arising from the technological acceleration of global trade and data flow.

Shinae Yoon ’23 is a research assistant to Professors Cathy Hwang and Danielle Citron, an editorial board member of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology, and a Community Fellow. She also served on the boards of the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association and Women of Color. Prior to law school, she worked as a research technician in a bioengineering lab. She is interested in intellectual property, data privacy and emerging technology.
 

Graduated Fellows

Bao Kham Chau ’22 is a co-founder/director at Cornell Law Xenophobia Meter Project, a visiting fellow at CornellTech Digital Life Initiative and at the CornellTech Research Lab in Applied Law + Technology, and an adviser at the Harvard Berkman Klein Center’s Institute for Rebooting Social Media. He is interested in pursuing two related strands of research at the intersection of law and technology. Broadly speaking, he seeks to explore how the changing technological landscape affects the current legal regulatory frameworks (e.g., internet and artificial intelligence governance). At the same time, Chau also investigates how to use computational text analysis techniques to help derive novel insights into the judiciary of developed, developing and authoritarian states. Before entering legal private practice at Fish & Richardson, Bao worked as a (senior) software engineer for three successful startups in the Silicon Valley. He received his B.A. in computer science, history (honors), and political science from the University of California, Berkeley, an A.M. in regional studies, East Asia from Harvard University, and a J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

Emily Hockett ’22 is the Reporters Committee’s Technology and Press Freedom Project fellow. As a UVA Law student, she was a member of the First Amendment Clinic, working on public records matters and amicus briefs under the supervision of Reporters Committee attorneys. Emily graduated from New York University in 2018. 

Peter Kaplan ’22 serves as the managing editor for Volume 107 of the Virginia Law Review. He served as a 2021 summer associate at Kaplan Hecker & Fink, where he is now working after graduation. During the summer of 2020, Kaplan served as a legal associate at Salesforce. He is also a Virginia Law and Public Service Fellow, a member and former career co-chair of Lambda Law Alliance; a member of the student organization Law, Innovation, Security & Technology; and a member of the Jewish Law Students Association. Prior to law school, Kaplan was strategy director at Helena and program manager at the Aspen Institute. He began his career in Washington, D.C., as a Brent Scowcroft Award Fellow with the Aspen Strategy Group.

Rebecca Weitzel ’22 now works at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, where she is a member of the firm’s Privacy and Cybersecurity practice group. While at UVA Law, she was editor-in-chief of the Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and president of the Law, Innovation, Security & Technology Society.

Gabriele Josephs