Resident Faculty

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Rachel A. Harmon
Criminal law, criminal procedure, policing and civil rights
  • Prosecuted federal civil rights crimes for the Civil Rights Division, Criminal Section of the Department of Justice, including hate crimes and official misconduct cases, many of which involved excessive force or sexual abuse by police officers.
  • Clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer and for Judge Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit 
  • M.Sc. in political theory and M.Sc. in political sociology, London School of Economics 
  • Harmon's scholarship focuses on the legal regulation of the police and mechanisms for improving policing. (Scholarship Profile)
John Harrison
Administrative law, constitutional law and history
  • Clerked for Judge Robert Bork on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
  • Served as counselor on international law in the Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State (2008)
  • Worked with the Department of Justice in numerous capacities, including deputy assistant attorney general in the Office of Legal Counsel (1990-93)
  • A text-based interpreter of the Constitution, in 2009 Harrison testified before Congress about the legality and powers of the White House policy advisers referred to as "czars."
Andrew Hayashi
Tax law and policy, behavioral economics
  • Ph.D. in economics from University of California, Berkeley; M.Sc. in economics and philosophy from the London School of Economics 
  • Was a research fellow at the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy at New York University, where his research focused on the effects of tax policy on real estate and housing markets
  • Hayashi's research on "tax salience" — meaning how visible a tax is — showed a correlation between higher salience and a higher number of appeals of property tax assessments.
Deborah Hellman
Affirmative action and equal protection, constitutional law and theory
  • Awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for University Teachers in 1999
  • Author of the book "When Is Discrimination Wrong?" 
  • Hellman's work primarily focuses on discrimination and equality. In addition, she writes about the constitutionality of campaign finance laws and the obligations of professional roles, especially in the context of clinical medical research. (Scholarship Profile | Faculty Q&A)
Toby Heytens
Civil rights and criminal procedure
  • Clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and for then-Chief Judge Edward R. Becker of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit 
  • Worked in the Office of the Solicitor General, arguing six cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, and at O’Melveny & Myers, where his practice focused on appellate litigation
  • Heytens' recent article published in the Stanford Law Review focused on judicial reassignment in federal appellate courts (Faculty Q&A)
A. E. Dick Howard
Constitutional law and history, Supreme Court
  • Was a law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo L. Black, and is now one of the nation's foremost experts on the court (Supreme Court Roundup)
  • Executive Director the commission that wrote Virginia's current constitution and directed the successful referendum campaign for its ratification
  • Has been consulted by constitutional draftsmen around the world
  • In 2013 the University of Virginia recognized Howard with its Thomas Jefferson Award — the highest honor given to faculty members at the University. (Scholarship Profile)
Rich Hynes
Bankruptcy and consumer finance law
  • Ph.D. in economics, University of Pennsylvania 
  • Practiced law with Skadden Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in Los Angeles
  • Hynes focuses on parallel systems outside of bankruptcy that handle debtor-creditor relations, including the use of state courts to collect debts. (Scholarship Profile)