Kathryn Fuller to Give Inaugural Lillian Stone Distinguished Lecture in Environmental Policy on Oct. 20

Kathryn Fuller

Kathryn Fuller serves on a number of boards, including Alcoa, the Summit Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Greater Himalayas Foundation.

October 6, 2014

Kathryn Fuller, chair of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History, will give the inaugural Lillian Stone Distinguished Lecture in Environmental Policy on Oct. 20 at the University of Virginia School of Law.

Fuller's presentation, "The Changing Face of Nature Conservation," will be held in the Law School's Caplin Pavilion at 5:30 p.m. The lecture is open to the public, and parking will be available in Law School lots. A reception will open and follow the event.

The lecture, made possible through a gift from University of Virginia alumni Thatcher Stone (Law '82) and Frank Kittredge (Architecture '78), is hosted jointly by the Schools of Architecture and Law. The lectureship is intended to fulfill the intellectual and educational commitments of the two schools by creating an opportunity for students to be educated in environmental policy and the National Environmental Policy Act.

Fuller serves on a number of boards, including Alcoa, the Summit Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Greater Himalayas Foundation. She is president emerita and honorary board member of the World Wildlife Fund and former chair of the Ford Foundation.

Before joining the WWF, she worked at the U.S. Department of Justice, first in the Office of Legal Counsel, then as a trial attorney in the Land and Natural Resources Division, where she helped create the Wildlife and Marine Resources Section. She became chief of the section in 1981, and in 1992 was a special adviser to the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro.

Fuller received her B.A. in English and American literature from Brown University. She earned a law degree with honors from the University of Texas and pursued graduate studies in marine, estuarine and environmental science at the University of Maryland.

 

Founded in 1819, the University of Virginia School of Law is the second-oldest continuously operating law school in the nation. Consistently ranked among the top law schools, Virginia is a world-renowned training ground for distinguished lawyers and public servants, instilling in them a commitment to leadership, integrity and community service.

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