News by Topic

September 26, 2008

Winston Wilkinson, director of the Office of Civil Rights for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, spoke to students Thursday about race and Mormonism during an event sponsored by the Black Law Students Association and the Rex E. Lee Society. 

September 24, 2008

Sometimes when other African Americans learn he is a Republican Mormon who now lives in Utah, Winston Wilkinson gets a startled reception.

September 2, 2008

Ending affirmative action in recruiting students to U.S. law schools would come at an unacceptable cost, said Law School professor Alex Johnson Thursday at a resident faculty speaker series event sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law.

September 2, 2008

Ending affirmative action in recruiting students to U.S. law schools would come at an unacceptable cost, said Law School professor Alex Johnson Thursday at a resident faculty speaker series event sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law.

April 8, 2008

A panel sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law discusses Law School Professor Risa Goluboff's new book, "The Lost Promise of Civil Rights." Panelists include Goluboff; Danny Greenberg of Schulte, Roth & Zabel LLP; and Professor Tomiko Brown-Nagin.

February 7, 2008

Prof. Klarman lectures about his newly released book, "Unfinished Business."

November 9, 2007

In his new book, "Unfinished Business: Racial Equality in American History," Virginia law professor Michael Klarman traces the long and turbulent history of race relations in America.

November 6, 2007

U.S. criminal justice policies over the past few decades have unfairly affected black Americans, charged Marc Mauer, executive director of The Sentencing Project, during a talk to students Oct. 30 at the Law School.

October 2, 2007

Professor Brandon Garrett spoke about his groundbreaking research on DNA testing to prove wrongful convictions and the U.S. criminal justice system’s faulty appeals process at a Sept. 24 event at the Law School.

October 2, 2007

Professor Brandon Garrett spoke about his groundbreaking research on DNA testing to prove wrongful convictions and the U.S. criminal justice system’s faulty appeals process at a Sept. 24 event at the Law School.

September 26, 2007

Richard Banks, a law professor at Stanford, spoke to Law School students Sept. 21 about the problems that arise from the blurred boundary between discriminatory racial profiling and the more acceptable suspect description reliance in the post Sept. 11 world.

September 26, 2007

Richard Banks, a law professor at Stanford, spoke to Law School students Sept. 21 about the problems that arise from the blurred boundary between discriminatory racial profiling and the more acceptable suspect description reliance in the post Sept. 11 world.

September 17, 2007

The late Oliver W. Hill Sr., esteemed civil rights attorney, was honored for his integral role in the civil rights movement at a Law School event Sept. 13 in Caplin Pavilion.

September 17, 2007

The late Oliver W. Hill Sr., esteemed civil rights attorney, was honored for his integral role in the civil rights movement at a Law School event Sept. 13 in Caplin Pavilion.

September 11, 2007

With one year as assistant director of the Center for the Study of Race and Law under his belt, Tim Lovelace '06 has begun to realize the goals he set out to accomplish in his role.

April 25, 2007

Students at Virginia Law and across the country today began two days of action calling for the restoration of habeas corpus and fair hearings for the almost 400 detainees who remain at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

February 19, 2007

Virginia Gov. Timothy Kaine offered law students guidance on how to pursue a career in public service during his keynote address at the eighth annual student-organized Conference on Public Service and the Law in Caplin Auditorium Saturday. 

February 6, 2007

Virginia Gov. Timothy M. Kaine will deliver the keynote address at this year's Conference on Public Service and the Law, to be held Friday and Saturday, Feb. 16 and 17, at the Law School.

November 14, 2006

Rita Simon, professor of public affairs at American University and author of more than 50 books, spoke Friday about her influential research showing that most children who are adopted into families of a different race are well-adjusted and content.

November 7, 2006

Lawyers occupy a special place in society, as the representatives of the profession that represents the rights of the privileged, the underprivileged, the many, and the few.

November 7, 2006

Lawyers occupy a special place in society, as the representatives of the profession that represents the rights of the privileged, the underprivileged, the many, and the few. 

October 16, 2006

During the current Supreme Court term, justices will consider a pair of cases that could determine whether race will be a continuing factor in assigning students to specific schools at the elementary and secondary level. Conventional wisdom holds that there is a substantial benefit to minority students when they learn in integrated schools. Recent studies, however, suggest that may not necessarily be true, said Yale law professor Richard Brooks, who explained the findings of a new body of statistical analysis in an Oct. 3 event at the Law School.

May 11, 2006

It took a moment to sink in when the verdict was read, but Earl Washington Jr. knew things were going to go his way when the jury agreed with his claim that a police officer fabricated evidence in Washington's criminal trial.

April 28, 2006

The Law School will be offering several new clinics during the next academic year, including the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, one of only a handful in law schools nationwide that focus on live Supreme Court cases.

April 10, 2006

Laws don't protect children from abuse in Iran and a lack of information on the problem inhibits reform on the issue, said Sara Shapouri '05, who returned to the Law School to detail her experiences working as a Monroe Leigh Fellow.

March 17, 2006

Race should not be considered a risk factor in determining whether someone is likely to commit a violent crime in the future, Professor John Monahan said at a talk sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law March 15.

February 17, 2006

At the time, Johnson's case was one of a string of incidents of police violence against African Americans-police officers shot and killed Amadou Diallo in 1999, and brutally tortured Abner Louima in 1997 — that brought accusations of racial profiling against the New York City police department, as well as calls for reform nationwide. Individual cases succeeded in winning settlements, but class-action lawsuits had little chance of winning, explained Professor Brandon Garrett at a Center for the Study of Race and Law talk Feb. 15.

February 15, 2006

Although political pressure, lawsuits, and even the U.S. Department of Justice helped initiate the statistical tracking of racial profiling, police also may have discovered something that helped them change their ways, according to Professor Brandon Garrett. 

February 6, 2006

On June 4, 1982, a young housewife named Linda Williams, three small children in tow, returned to her Culpeper apartment after an evening errand to 7-Eleven.

November 21, 2005

America's first restrictive federal immigration law used rhetoric about prostitution and polygamy to accomplish a hidden agenda of racial exclusion against Chinese immigrants, according to law professor Kerry Abrams, who spoke Wednesday at a lecture sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law and the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA).

November 2, 2005

Legal forms of sex discrimination still exist in the military and in private employment, leaving women at a disadvantage in the workplace, law professor Anne Coughlin said during a Women of Color brown-bag lunch Oct. 31.

October 31, 2005

Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark 1954 school desegregation case often hailed for ushering in the civil rights era and striking a fatal blow to Jim Crow, may have helped perpetuate material inequalities between black and white Americans, according to law professor Risa Goluboff, who presented her research on pre- Brown civil rights strategies at a lecture sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law Oct. 26.

October 24, 2005

Recent findings in implicit social cognition (ISC) — a science that measures people's subconscious biases — can provide a scientific basis for justifying and revising affirmative action, according to Jerry Kang, a UCLA law professor who explained his "behavioral realist" model of affirmative action at an Oct. 21 talk sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law.

October 14, 2005

Advocates for racial and ethnic diversity in public schools should find their work easier with a guide to relevant legal and policy issues jointly prepared by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (LDF), the Center for the Study of Race and Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, and Harvard University's Civil Rights Project.

March 4, 2005

Professor Kim Forde-Mazrui opened the doors of his Race and Law seminar to the public in an effort to bring greater understanding of recent incidents of racially motivated hate speech at the University and suggest possible legal responses, at a March 2 event sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law and the Black Law Students Association.

March 1, 2005

While working for a downtown Boston law firm after college, Robin Runge found her calling.

February 28, 2005

President Lyndon Baines Johnson and civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. were virtually co-conspirators in the critical months leading to the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act according to Nick Kotz, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting while a reporter for The Washington Post.

February 7, 2005

As the civil rights era recedes into history, younger Americans in particular fail to appreciate the courage of black leaders who challenged segregated society, law professor Michael Klarman, author of From Jim Crow to Civil Rights, The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality, told the audience at a Feb. 2 talk sponsored by the Black Law Students Association to kick off the Law School's observation of Black History Month.

February 2, 2004

Federal tax laws that hurt dual-income married couples disproportionately hurt African-American households, said visiting law professor Dorothy Brown.

November 17, 2003

Affirmative action programs corrode minorities' long-term aspirations and should be abandoned because they violate basic American democratic values of equality and merit, according to University of Michigan philosophy professor Carl Cohen.

October 13, 2003

The number of black lawyers in Virginia rose steadily during Reconstruction, when there were virtually no criteria for admission to the bar, but stagnated once the state passed its Jim Crow constitution in 1902, visiting law professor J. Gordon Hylton told a small group on hand Oct. 13 for a student/faculty workshop sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Law.

September 16, 2003

Law students and faculty packed into Caplin Pavilion Sept. 3 to hear professors Elizabeth Magill, Stephen Smith, and Law School Dean John Jeffries assess the rulings of the last session of the Supreme Court, a debriefing that customarily launches a new academic year.

April 7, 2003

As a federal judge in the Southern District of New York, Judge Denny Chin sees some of the most cutting-edge cases in the country, so much so that three of his cases were used as plots for the popular Law and Order television series.

March 27, 2003

Law professor Mildred Robinson remembers clearly the day the Supreme Court handed down the Brown vs. Board of Education decision ruling that "separate but equal" schools violated the 14th Amendment.

March 18, 2003

Two weeks before they meet at the U.S. Supreme Court for a fateful showdown on affirmative action admissions policies at the nation's public universities, the opposing sides in Grutter v. Bollinger held a pretrial scrimmage at the Law School March 15 as the main event of the 4th annual Conference on Public Service and the Law.

March 13, 2003

With politicians playing fast and loose with public funds and the accounting industry severely weakened by Enron and other scandals, the world will increasingly turn to lawyers to deal with issues presented by globalization because of the foundation in ethics and problem-solving they receive in law school, said American Bar Association president-elect nominee Robert L. Grey Jr. at a rescheduled Black Law Students Association Black History Month event held March 11 at the Law School.

March 12, 2003

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA  Organizers of the March Against Racial Hatred expect several hundred University of Virginia students and Charlottesville community members to march to the Rotunda tomorrow night to express their condemnation of racial hatred. At 8 p.m. at the Rotunda during a candlelight vigil, a group of speakers composed of student leaders and faculty members will call for renewed efforts to address racial problems at the University. The event will end in a student-led speak-out.

February 21, 2003

For a country that extols the rule of law and individual rights, the United States has had a very hard time extending those values to African-Americans, the Hon. Roger L. Gregory of the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit said in a Feb. 13 speech sponsored by the Black Law Students Association.

February 7, 2003

American Indians thought of fathers foremost as providers, not as bosses, and so were perplexed by how whites behaved after pacts using the term father were agreed to, according to Morris Arnold, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit and a pioneer in the field of intercultural legal history. Indian and white notions of what terms meant were often at variance, Arnold told the Federalist Society Feb. 5.

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