International Human Rights Law Clinic (YR)

Section 1, Fall 17

Schedule Information

Enrollment: 4/10
Credits: 3

Course Description

This year-long clinic provides first-hand experience in human rights advocacy in partnership with non-governmental organizations (NGOs), human rights practitioners, and law firms in the United States and abroad. Not all projects will have direct client representation, but some will. Clinic projects are selected to build the knowledge and skills necessary to be an effective human rights advocate, while exploring the opportunities and limitations of human rights institutions and the diversity of practice. Students will work in teams on one or more projects throughout the year, and all students will have direct contact with their clients or with supervising attorneys in client NGOs. Some travel to Washington DC will be required, but it will be scheduled on a flexible basis to accommodate student schedules. Students will have an option (but are not required) to participate in international field research or representation over winter break. Students will be required to check in with their clients or their supervising attorneys on a weekly basis. Class discussions during the fall semester will focus on human rights law concepts, ethical and professional dilemmas that may arise in human rights lawyering, critical examinations of human rights movements and campaigns, and the design of integrated advocacy strategies. Classes will not be required on a regular basis during the spring semester, although approximately four class sessions will be scheduled on a flexible basis in the spring to share case developments and present research on human rights topics. The Clinic will provide substantial opportunities throughout the year to network with human rights practitioners and to develop practical skills including international human rights research and writing; litigating human rights claims in international forums; advocating before the US government and international organizations; and documenting and publicizing human rights violations. Projects for 2017-2018 may focus on one or more of these themes: protecting the fundamental human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals in hostile legal environments outside of the United States; advocacy and litigation before regional human rights bodies in the Inter-American or African human rights systems; ensuring access to development opportunities financed by the World Bank in cases before the World Bank Inspection Panel; and advocacy before the UN human rights institutions and treaty bodies.

Course Requirements

Exam Info:
Midterm Type (if any): None
Description: None

Final Type (if any): None
Description:

Written Work Product
Written Work Product: Students will provide substantial written work on one or more clinical assignments, which could include legal briefs and advocacy papers depending on the project. Students will be asked to travel to Washington, DC one or more times per semester.

Other Work

Other Course Details
Prerequisites: International Law and Human Rights Law are encouraged but not required as prerequisites. Students who have not taken either of these courses will be required to participate in an additional skills-building class at a mutually agreed time during the first two weeks of the fall semester. Concurrencies: None
Mutually Exclusive With: None
Laptops Allowed: Yes
First Day Attendance Required: No
Course Notes: Classes will not be required on a regular basis during the spring semester, although approximately four class sessions will be scheduled on a flexible basis in the spring to share case developments and provide ongoing skills-building opportunities. Students will be asked to travel to Washington, DC one or more times per semester. Times and days should be flexible depending on student schedules. Note that classes are mandatory on a weekly basis during the fall semester, but the clinic will only meet approximately four times in the spring semester. Students may enroll in one clinic per semester. On a space-available basis, students may petition to enroll in a second clinic offering after the add/drop period has ended. NOTE REGARDING CREDITS: Of the six credits awarded for this clinic, three will receive a "credit/no credit" grade at the conclusion of the fall semester, and three will receive a letter grade at the conclusion of the spring semester.

Graduation Requirements

*Satisfies Writing Requirement: No
**Credits For Prof. Skills Requirement: Yes
Satisfies Professional Ethics: No

*Yes means professor requires everyone in the course to submit a substantial research paper (which is the requirement standard in Academic Policies), so no paperwork required to be submitted to SRO. No means student must timely submit paperwork to SRO if intending to use a paper in this course to satisfy the Writing Requirement.

**Yes indicates course credits count towards UVA Law’s Prof. Skills graduation requirement, not necessarily a skills requirements for any particular state bar.

General Information

Schedule No.
117820012
Law No.
LAW8638
Modified Type
Clinical
Cross Listed: No
Cross-Listed Course Mnemonic:
Public Syllabus Link: None
Evaluation Portal Via LawWeb Opens:
Evaluation Portal Via LawWeb Closes: