Barbara Spellman

When Predictions Create Reality: Judgments of Learning May Alter What They Are Intended to Assess

CO-AUTHORS Robert A. Bjork
PUBLISHER
Psychological Science
DATE
1992-09-1
 

UVA Law Faculty Affiliations

Barbara A. Spellman

Abstract

Nelson and Dunlosky (Psychological Science, July 1991) reported that subjects making judgments of learning (JOLs) can be extremely accurate at predicting subsequent recall performance on a paired-associate task when the JOL task is delayed for a short while after study They argued that this result is surprising given the results of earlier research, as well as their own current experiment, indicating that JOLs are quite inaccurate when made immediately after study We note that the delayed-JOL procedure used by Nelson and Dunlosky invited covert recall practice (which was reported by their subjects) Retrieval practice is a well-known determinant of subsequent recall Accordingly, Nelson and Dunloskys findings can be explained by the simple assumption that people base delayed JOLs on an assessment of retrieval success which in turn influences their retrieval success on the subsequent recall test.

Citation

Robert A. Bjork & Barbara A. Spellman, When Predictions Create Reality: Judgments of Learning May Alter What They Are Intended to Assess, 3 Psychological Science 315-317 (1992).
 

More in This Category