Barbara Spellman

Accuracy, Confidence, and Calibration: How Young Children and Adults Assess Credibility

CO-AUTHORS Elizabeth R. Tenney, Jenna E. Small, Robyn Kondrad, and Vikram K. Jaswal
PUBLISHER
Developmental Psychology
DATE
2011
 

UVA Law Faculty Affiliations

Barbara A. Spellman

Abstract

Do children and adults use the same cues to judge whether someone is a reliable source of information? In 4 experiments, we investigated whether children (ages 5 and 6) and adults used information regarding accuracy, confidence, and calibration (i.e., how well an informant's confidence predicts the likelihood of being correct) to judge informants' credibility. We found that both children and adults used information about confidence and accuracy to judge credibility; however, only adults used information about informants' calibration. Adults discredited informants who exhibited poor calibration, but children did not. Requiring adult participants to complete a secondary task while evaluating informants' credibility impaired their ability to make use of calibration information. Thus, children and adults may differ in how they infer credibility because of the cognitive demands of using calibration.

Citation

Vikram K. Jaswal et al., Accuracy, Confidence, and Calibration: How Young Children and Adults Assess Credibility, 47 Developmental Psychology 1065-1077 (2011).
 

More in This Category