Deborah Hellman

The Epistemic Commitments of Nondiscrimination

PUBLISHER
Oxford University Press
DATE
2022-01-25
 

Abstract

A commitment to nondiscrimination at times appears to require both that one not act in particular ways and that one not believe certain things. This is potentially troubling if one ought to believe what one has warrant to believe, and to the extent that one can take actions that affect what one comes to believe, one ought to do so with the aim of acquiring true beliefs. This article argues that current social controversies – like the debate over the memo by the Google employee which claimed that women are less suited for careers in technology fields – demonstrate that some defenders of norms of nondiscrimination understand these norms as including epistemic commitments. The article articulates what these epistemic commitments are, explores whether they can themselves be epistemically justified and, if not, situates the popular controversy in a philosophical debate about whether moral considerations properly encroach on epistemic norms.

Citation

Deborah Hellman, The Epistemic Commitments of Nondiscrimination, in John Gardner, Leslie Green, and Brian Leiter Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Law Volume 4, Oxford University Press (2022).