John Monahan

Violence to Others, Violent Self-Victimization, and Violent Victimization by Others Among Persons with a Mental Illness

CO-AUTHORS Paul S. Appelbaum, Pamela Clark Robbins, and Roumen Vesselinov
PUBLISHER
Psychiatric Services
DATE
2017
 

Abstract

Objective: This research examined the frequency of and characteristics associated with three forms of violence among persons with mental illness—violence directed at others, self-directed violence, and violence directed at them by others.
 
Methods: Previously unreported data from a follow-up sample of 951 patients from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study were analyzed to characterize involvement in violence directed at others, self-directed violence, and violence directed at them by others.
 
Results: Most patients (58%) experienced at least one form of violence, 28% experienced at least two forms, and 7% experienced all three forms. Several diagnostic, social, and historical variables distinguished the groups.
 
Conclusions: Given the substantial overlap among the three forms of violence, clinicians should routinely screen patients who report one form for the occurrence of the other two. Co-occurrence of several forms of violence may require a package of interventions with components geared to each.

Citation

Paul S. Appelbaum et al., Violence to Others, Violent Self-Victimization, and Violent Victimization by Others Among Persons with a Mental Illness, 68 Psychiatric Services 516-519 (2017).
 

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