Show Notes: The Lawyer in Your Computer

Common Law logo
 

About the Podcast

Though much divides us these days, there are still some things we all share in common. One of them is law. In “Common Law,” a new podcast sponsored by the University of Virginia School of Law, Dean Risa Goluboff and Vice Dean Leslie Kendrick explore how law shapes society, how we shape law and why we should all care. MORE

Subscribe to our podcast here. If you like what you hear, please leave us a review and/or share the episode with a friend.

Michael Livermore
Episode 7: The Lawyer in Your Computer

From courtroom apps to analyzing law texts, UVA Law professor Michael Livermore explains how technology is reshaping legal processes and yielding new insights. More

How to Listen
Show Notes: The Lawyer in Your Computer

Michael Livermore

Michael Livermore is a professor of law at the University of Virginia, teaching administrative law, environmental law, and regulatory law and policy. He is a pioneer in the application of computational tools in legal studies, enabling a new methodological approach to evaluating legal texts. To help curate the Livermore regularly engages in interdisciplinary projects across disciplines ranging from economics, computer science and neurology. He is also a leading expert on the use of cost-benefit analysis to evaluate environmental regulation, co-authoring “Retaking Rationality: How Cost-Benefit Analysis Can Better Protect the Environment and Our Health” and co-editing of “The Globalization of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Environmental Policy.”

Before joining the faculty, Livermore was the founding executive director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law, his alma mater. Following law school, Livermore was a fellow at NYU’s Center on Environmental and Land Use Law, then clerked for Judge Harry T. Edwards of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. In one of his latest articles, “A Quantitative Analysis of Writing Style on the Supreme Court,” Livermore presents a quantitative analysis of the text of past U.S. Supreme Court opinions to discern patterns and implications about the institution’s behaviors.

Listening to the Show